Curbing zoonotic diseases – Will wet markets be hung out to dry after the pandemic? | International

Curbing zoonotic diseases – Will wet markets be hung out to dry after the pandemic? | International

May 26th 2020HONG KONG, KAMPALA AND SULAWESIEditor’s note: Some of our covid-19 coverage is free for readers of The Economist Today, our daily newsl

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WHEN ANTHONY FAUCI, a well-respected immunologist on President Donald Trump’s coronavirus task-force, called for the worldwide banning of wet markets last month, he may have had in mind somewhere like Tomohon in Indonesia. The highland town is surrounded by lush countryside in northern Sulawesi, home to the Minahasa people and an amazing diversity of wildlife.

Much of it makes its way to Tomohon’s covered market, where it is laid out on countless butchers’ slabs: warty pigs, flying foxes (actually, a fruit bat), reticulated pythons and the Sulawesi giant rat. Before feast days other specimens, all illegally caught, find their way to the stalls, among them the rare Celebes crested macaque, a large jet-black monkey, and the Sulawesi bear cuscus, a tree-dwelling marsupial. Domestic dogs in cages also wait their turn as traders with blow torches burn off slaughtered…



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